Overpriced-Coffee2

Ditch the Overpriced Coffee

You don’t have to search far and wide to find a hypocritical Christian. You know, the kind of Christ-follower that says one thing and does another. In Revelation 3:1-6, we’re introduced to a local church that’s going through a similar problem. The church in Sardis had this reputation of being a great church. Things were happening. I’m sure they had a dynamic youth program, a creative team with an eye for design, solid worship, and maybe even challenging Biblical preaching. This church was the place to be. It was, after all, the church to belong to. They had a reputation of being alive! After imagining this church, I bet it sounds appealing and almost makes you want to give it a shot this Sunday. Unfortunately, this church had a big problem: they were hypocrites.

A hypocrite is someone who says something and does another, and like I said before, there are plenty of Christian hypocrites out there. This church in Sardis was called out by Jesus on their hypocrisy. Sure they had a reputation, but they were far from where they should be. They were told to wake up before it was too late. Christians in Sardis were told to return to the genuine faith that they had at first. That letter in Revelation was a desperate warning to save this dying church. History isn’t entirely sure whether that church listened to Christ’s call or not, but we do know that today’s church is right back in that same problem of hypocrisy.

 

Sardis wasn’t the only one.

The church in Sardis dealt with the problem of hypocrisy, but they weren’t the only ones that had to deal with, or are dealing with this problem. Today, there are hypocritical Christians everywhere. You know, the kind of Christians that say all the things they need to say, but the life they live is far from the example of Christ. Maybe you know some of them? They look the part, they dress the part, but they are far from a genuine faith walk.

Hypocritical Christians jam out to their favorite trendy worship albums in the car. Hypocritical Christians have letters from their sponsored children at home on the fridge. Hypocritical Christians even post inspiring Christian messages all over social media. They’ll watch Christian television, read the latest and greatest Christian book, and even put scripture decor all over their homes. These hypocrite posers will often read scripture, while enjoying an overpriced coffee. Hypocritical Christians will pray for you, they give to the church, and even serve among the leadership. Yet, hypocritical Christians live a life defined, not by Jesus, but by sin.

 

Stop pointing fingers.

Today, we’re a bunch of hypocrites. Like my friend, Jarrid Wilson, says: we need to break free from poser Christianity! It’s easy to sit here and point fingers. Look, there’s a poser over there! Don’t go to that church, they’re a bunch of hypocrites! Those people say they do good, but they are far from good! Yet, I never thought of myself as the problem. Even while I was sitting down to type these thoughts, I was convicted.

It’s easy to read through the passage in Revelation 3, and shake our heads at the hypocritical nature of the church in Sardis. It’s even easy to point to other Christians that are doing the same thing. But, the last thing I want to think about is the fact that the majority of us are living a life of reputation instead of living out a genuine walk with Jesus. We can sit here and point fingers, but we fail to point out the worst hypocrites of all: YOU & ME!

 

I’m here today to tell you that I am a hypocrite. I’ve been talking a good talk, but I’ve failed to truly walk the way God called me to live. I’ve been living for my reputation, instead of living for Jesus. But, I’m ready to change. Will you join me on this journey? Are you ready to stop pretending and start living? Ditch that overpriced coffee and just be real.

 

*This message has been adapted from Scott’s November 29th sermon Mismatched.
(Photo by Flickr user: Basheer Tome)

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Conflict

When Conflict Happens

When was the list time you experienced conflict? In today’s world, it doesn’t take long before we are confronted with tension. Turn on the television and listen to some news headlines. Politicians throw punches with words. Countries send messages with tanks and fighter jets. People enact revenge for the dumbest of reasons. Conflict even occurs in our relationships with those around us. A little argument can threaten to destroy friendships or even families. Conflict is everywhere and it’s out of control. In Acts 15, Paul and Barnabas have one of these times of tension in their relationship.

In it’s infancy, the church had people for all sorts of backgrounds. There were some Pharisees (group of people who studied the Jewish religious law) who joined the church. This group thought that in order to be saved, you had to first follow the Jewish religious law before following Jesus. They were teaching that you had to “be circumcised” in order to be saved. Because of this false teaching, the council met in Jerusalem. Paul and Barnabas were there in order to inform the council of what great things were done through the Gentiles (these people didn’t attempt to follow the Jewish religious law). Upon leaving, Paul & Barnabas decided to head back out on another missionary journey, but they were in disagreement whether to take Mark along with them.

Let’s take a look at a few things we can learn from this conflict between these two spiritual giants…

 

Conflict should stay on a personal level.

After the council meeting, Paul and Barnabas decided to head out again to visit the churches that they had started. Barnabas was ready, but he wanted to take Mark along. Paul disagreed. It’s little conflicts like these that comes along in our everyday lives. Maybe you want to get the family together for Thanksgiving, but decide to try a new turkey recipe this year. Or you get some friends together to watch the game and you forget to invite a certain someone. Word spreads. Pretty soon your great aunt is on the phone with your cousin, trying to persuade them of how evil of a person you are. When conflict arises, take Paul & Barnabas’s advice. It should just stay between the parties involved. Paul didn’t go around and hang posters convincing the world of his decision not to include Mark. Barnabas didn’t write epistles about how evil Paul was for leaving out Mark. They just kept it to themselves. We need to do the same.

 

Conflict shouldn’t be taken personally.

Relationships without conflict aren’t relationships at all. God’s creation was good, until Adam & Eve did the one thing they were told not to. We rebelled against God and we now have to pay the price. Because we live in a fallen world, conflict with always exist. There will always be disagreements, fights, and even the silent treatment. You’ll never get along perfectly with anyone. Sometimes I catch myself thinking, “If only people were just like me! This world would be a better place.” The truth is it wouldn’t. It would be just as screwed up, just as sinful, just as conflict-ridden as always. We’re all that way. Because of the flesh, we’ll always have the tendency to want to look better in an argument. We want to be right and we want them to be wrong. When conflict does occur, we need to remember what’s more important. Why did God create Adam & Eve? Why do we exist? For relationship! Don’t let a simple disagreement destroy a friendship. Approach conflict like Paul & Barnabas. Don’t take it personally.

 

Conflict should be handled in a way that gives glory to Jesus.

Paul & Barnabas were in the midst of a disagreement. After some quick discussion, it was done. They parted ways. Paul went ahead with Silas, and Barnabas left with Mark. It’s easy to think that this disagreement was a bad thing. But a simple disagreement itself isn’t bad. It’s how we respond to the disagreement that could potentially be bad. Paul & Barnabas kept this disagreement between the two parties involved. They didn’t go out and attempt to convince others of their cause. They kept it between themselves and they didn’t take it personally. Paul & Barnabas knew what was most important: their relationship. Because they handled this conflict in a Godly way, Jesus was glorified. As a result of these two parting ways, new churches were started, others were involved in ministry, and the book of Mark was written! A simple conflict, and many more people came to know Jesus because of it.

 

Every relationship is bound to have conflict. We’ll argue about anything just so we can win. But we need to remember what’s most important. The next time conflict comes along in one of your relationships, respond like Paul & Barnabas. Keep it between the parties involved, don’t take it personally, and always handle it in a way that gives glory to Jesus! How are you handling conflict? Are you glorifying yourself or Jesus?

 

(Photo by Flickr User: Keoni Cabral)

Baptism

What’s The Deal With Baptism?

Summer is in full swing. If you’re having a summer that’s anything close to mine, you’re drowning right about now. It’s a busy season at Hillside Bible Church. We just finished our summer vacation bible school program (we call it Camp Hillside…it’s cooler), began our summer youth events with our annual Messy Night, and are busy making plans for our fall kickoff. So far this summer, we’ve seen 18 people come to know Christ! This past Sunday was exciting as well. Like we do every year, we had our worship service outside at our church property. It is always a beautiful experience to worship the Creator in the midst of His creation. During that worship service, I had the honor of doing a couple of baptisms as well.

Baptism can be a confusing thing, but it doesn’t have to be. Today, churches and denominations differ on who to baptize, how to baptize, and when to baptize. Churches will even have different positions on why they practice baptism in the first place. Some christians place too high importance on baptism, and some too little. In light of this present struggle I decided to post a few thoughts myself on the subject of baptism.

 

Baptisms aren’t magical.

When I was younger, I attended a local vacation bible school program. It was during that week long experience where I accepted Christ as my Lord and Savior. Like the good little baptist boy I was, I was soon thereafter dunked into the baptismal waters. For me, expectation was everything. I expected to go into the waters “Scott v.1″ and come out of the waters “Scott v.2″. The problem was I didn’t feel any different. After being baptized, I still struggled with my sin nature. After my baptism, I still felt like the same old Scott I was. Baptism wasn’t the magical water that I had expected it to be. Churches need to stop sending mixed messages. Baptisms aren’t magical. The water isn’t anything special. It’s just water.

 

Baptisms aren’t a means of salvation.

Baptisms aren’t magical, and they won’t save you either. Just like Jesus said, there are churches and pastors today that preach and teach a message that’s different from the gospel. The good news of Jesus is the news in which we were lost but now we’re found. From the beginning of time, our sin nature got the best of us. And because we’ve sinned, we had a price to pay: death. Jesus came and died for us. He shed his blood on the cross as payment for our sins and then he rose again proving that if we just have faith in Him, we can have life! Salvation is found in Christ alone. We can’t earn our way to heaven. We cannot spend enough, work enough, give enough, pray enough, to earn our salvation. Baptism won’t do it either. The thief on the cross hanging next to Jesus wasn’t baptized prior to his death, yet he joined Jesus in paradise that day. Baptism won’t save you, only Jesus will.

 

Baptisms are a celebration!

Baptisms aren’t magical, and they aren’t your way to salvation either. So, what are they? What is this thing that so many churches practice? Baptisms are simply a celebration! The gospel, or good news, is the best news of all history. We were dead in our sins. Because of our sin nature, we had a price to pay: death. And because there was nothing we could do about it, we were doomed to be eternally separated from God. That is, until the Word became flesh. The Son left his place of glory with the Father and dwelt among us. Jesus lived a sinless life, but died a sinless death. He alone was the perfect sacrifice that we so desperately needed. Once you realize that Jesus loved you enough to die for you, your life changes. (Mine did!) This news, this gospel, is so life-changing, you’ll want to share it with the world. And, that’s where baptism comes in. Baptism is one way followers of Christ can share that message with the world.

 

Maybe this is the first time you’ve realized the power of that sacrifice Jesus made on the cross and you want to start a relationship with Him. That’s exciting! Don’t hesitate to contact me. I’d love to pray with you. Maybe you’ve been a follower of Jesus for some time now, but have yet to be baptized. Go celebrate the Son. Show the world how Jesus has changed you. Find a church and get dunked! Just don’t forget, baptism isn’t magic. It’s not going to save you. Baptism is just a celebration of Jesus!

 

 

(Original Baptism Photos By: Tom Harpootlian)

 

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Questions? Comments? Leave your thoughts below!

Worship

You’re Not Good Enough

…and that’s ok. Let me tell you why.

If you’re like me you’ve probably doubted yourself. Your ability. Your strengths. Seemingly-omnipotent failure looms filling you with fear and doubt. Especially when it comes to doing something for God. Afterall, there are plenty of people who :

are more eloquent public speakers
can throw a football further
are more accomplished guitarists
paint better
cook better
teach better

Better. Better. Better.

God only uses the best of the best….right?

Jesus called lowly, average fishermen to be some of his close disciples. Moses murdered a man, burried him in the sand, and eventually led Israel. Paul ruthlessly killed the very people he ended up being a revolutionary leader of. God often uses rejects and outcasts, the ones who are the furthest from what you’d typically think of as influential. The sick, the poor, murders. People who realized their faults, weaknesses, and insufficiencies and trusted God to use them anyway.

Next time you have a challenge ahead of you and think, ‘I can’t’ remember that that’s sometimes the point: you can’t. Not on your own anyway. It’ll take the redemptive and empowering power of Christ to see it through. If you allow it, God uses our vunerability in fearing defeat and dwelling on doubt to strengthen our relationship with him and to strengthen our faith. Often times it’s scarier than the fear of failure, but once you trust God fantastic things can happen.

If we were good enough on our own we wouldn’t need Jesus.

-Noah Lane

 

(Photo by Flickr User: susieq3c)

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Thoughts? Leave a comment below!

Interested in being one of our “Guest Voices”? Connect with Scott.

Misuse of Scripture

Verses We Misuse

A few weeks ago, I began teaching a course at church I’ve titled, “Break It Like Jesus”. In this class, we’ve been spending time exploring the Sermon on the Mount. More specifically, we’ve been looking for some of the ritualistic tendencies of the Pharisees that Jesus attempts to foil. Before we begin looking at some of these ritualistic tendencies, let’s first create a working definition for ritualism.

Ritualism: Regular observance of a ritual or tradition without regard to it’s function.

Ritualism is something done without remembering why it’s done. This is what Jesus does in the Sermon on the Mount. He strips things back, and peels back several layers in order to uncover function, and essentially break the ritualistic tendency. After reading through the Sermon on the Mount in Matthew 5-7, one can easily see that there were several things that early Christians and Jews were practicing ritualistically. Unfortunately, we see the same thing today.

Right away, Jesus gets into a discussion on anger, lust, divorce, oaths, retaliation, and loving your enemies. In these 6 passages (Mt. 5:21-26, 27-30, 31-32, 33-37, 38-42, 43-48) we find that they begin with the same language. Jesus says, “you have heard that it was said,” or, “it was also said.” He points out what they’re interpretation of scripture was in those days, and then corrects there interpretation. Simply put, Jesus points to their ritualistic use of scripture. In Jesus’ time, the Pharisees and religious leaders were using scripture to support their own methods and ideas. They would ritualistically use scripture (or misuse it). We do the same today. Don’t believe me? Here’s a few of the most commonly misused Bible verses of our time…

 

“Judge not, that you be not judged.” -Matthew 7:1

According to the world, we should just sit back and let believers and non-believers do whatever makes them happy. The world tells us that if we judge, if we throw out the sin word, if we point out wrongdoing, we’ll be judged as well. Unfortunately, as Christians we’re not supposed to let brothers and sisters in Christ do whatever makes them happy. Instead, we need to stick together in order to encourage each other in our walk with Christ. We’re called by Jesus to lovingly and respectfully approach fellow believers who are in sin, but we can’t forget about our own.

 

“I can do all things through him who strengthens me.” -Philippians 4:13

Apparently, according to Paul, if we know Jesus we can score touchdowns, hit a homer, score goals, and the like. While this verse doesn’t say that we can do feats of athletic accomplishments with Christ, it does suggest that we can overcome and persevere through times of tribulation and persecution with Jesus. That’s a promise we should cling to! Unfortunately, that’s not how this particular verse is often portrayed.

 

“For I know the plans I have for you, declares the LORD, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.” -Jeremiah 29:11

Woke up on the wrong side of the bed? Have a bad hair day? Money a bit tight? Don’t worry. Relax! Apparently, according to Jeremiah God is going to prosper or welfare you. NOT! That is, unless you’re exiled Israel wanting to return to the promised land, because that’s who this verse is really for.

 

We could go on all day. There are an innumerable amount of verses that are abused and misused in today’s world. The truth of the Gospel can only be interpreted one way, yet we often bring our own interpretations and opinions into account when reading scripture. It’s time we just let Jesus speak for himself. What are some verses that you’ve seen abused and misused recently?

 

(Photo by Flickr User: Steve Snodgrass)

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Have a misused Bible verse? Share it in the comments below!

Walk on Water

Walking On Water

A good friend of mine approached me yesterday and reminded me of the story of when Jesus walked on water. It’s such a great story! Jesus had just fed 5,000 people with just 5 loaves of bread and 2 fish. He figures it’s time for some alone time, so Jesus sends his disciples in a boat to cross the Sea of Galilee. Just a quick note on this sea. It’s not your typical backyard pond. It’s huge! It is about 13 miles long and 8 miles across, and the waters can get rough sometimes. The disciples begin their quest to cross the sea, but Jesus stays back to pray.

Sometime later, Jesus decides to rejoin the disciples. But there’s a problem. The boat is far out at Sea. Jesus is nowhere close to the boat. For Jesus, the solution is simple: walk on water. Once he approached the boat, the disciples were stricken with fear. They thought he was a ghost! Peter, being the most outgoing disciple there was, asked Jesus to call him out on the water. Jesus does just that, and Peter walks on water with Jesus. After reading through the story, and reflecting on this passage last night, I’ve found two things we can take away from the story that I wanted to share with you today.

 

When God Calls, Listen.

Jesus called out to Peter. He told him to come to Jesus on the water. Peter did just that. After hearing God’s call, Peter acted. How many of us have heard God’s call, but haven’t acted? Maybe you know that you’ve been given the gifts in order to work with children? Maybe you’ve been called to join a small group? Maybe you’ve been called to help the less fortunate? Maybe you’re doubting God’s push on your life to begin a relationship with him? God calls us for several different reasons. Personally, God has called me into ministry. God doesn’t do that for everyone, but he does call everyone into something. What is God calling you for? Have you listened?

 

When God Calls, Don’t Doubt It.

Jesus called out to Peter, and Peter walked out on the water toward Jesus. He was doing fine, until he began to see the wind and the waves. Peter doubted God’s call. How many of us have heard God’s call on our lives, but ended up doubting. May you’re saying, I’m not good enough to do that for God? Or maybe you’re trying to tell yourself that, you’re not gifted enough to act out on God’s calling? God doesn’t call you into ministry to be the next Billy Graham. He doesn’t call you to become a surgeon in order to be the surgeon general. He won’t call you into teaching in order to be the greatest teacher in history. He calls you, so stay you! Never doubt God’s call on your life. Hear it, and do it!

 

Are you struggling with finding God’s call on your life? Maybe your wrestling with the idea of being called to have a relationship with God? I’d love to talk with you. Simply connect with me.

 

(Photo by Flickr User: the_tahoe_guy)

 

 

Chill Pill

Take A Chill Pill

In his Sermon on the Mount, Jesus speaks of being the salt of the earth and the light of the world. He goes on to tell his followers to invest in heavenly treasure instead of the treasure of the world. Included in this famous sermon is a portion of discussion on anxiety & worry, where Jesus calls his followers to live different than the world. As the world tells us that we should worry about tomorrow and always be anxious about providing health, fortune, and freedom, Jesus tells us the exact opposite. He says that we should simply place our trust in God.

Anxiety and worry is something that plague our world. Life is stressful. Bills have to be paid, salaries must be made, and all while our dependency on God fades. But we’re told to live different. Jesus says that we shouldn’t worry, and we should be anxiety free. Today, I wanted to share why it’s important that we remember to take a chill pill.

 

We’re Of More Value

The beautiful thing about living in a small town in Mid-Michigan is that there are plenty of animals. Whether it’s deer walking in the backyard, or geese flying overhead, there are animals everywhere. All of these animals are a great reminder of how God takes care of us. The deer don’t go around wasting time worrying about tomorrow, because God takes care of them. Jesus tells the crowd that gathers that the animals don’t have to worry, but we shouldn’t have to worry either. We’re of way more value than they are. We were made in the image of God. We are special. If God takes care of the animals how much more than does God take care of us!

 

God’s Proven He Has Our Best In Mind

We shouldn’t worry. We shouldn’t be anxious. Instead we should place our trust in God and have faith in Him. God has already proven that He has our best intentions in mind. The proof is shaped like a cross. Because of our sinful lives, there was a price that had to be paid. Jesus put on flesh and paid our price in full on the cross. He died so that we could live. He had our best intentions in mind then, and He does now. Don’t worry. Trust in God.

 

Worrying is a way of life, but it shouldn’t be. God takes care of the animals. We’re made in the image of God. We’re special. He can take care of us too. He’s proven that he already has. The proof is shaped like a cross. Whenever your stricken with worry or anxiety this week, just remember the sacrifice that Jesus made on the cross for you! Don’t worry, just trust in God.

 

(Photo by Flickr User: Alon)

Fish

Live Deep

I know several people that will tell you that they know Jesus. They talk the talk and say all the right things. The problem is that when it comes to waking the walk, they walk a completely different walk than the one that Jesus has called us to. These people are surface level in their relationship with Jesus. Unfortunately, we’re not supposed to be just surface level. For the past several weeks, we’ve been going through a series titled Deep in Christ at Hillside, where we’ve been looking at Romans 12. This week was a little different.

Sunday, I had the honor of filling the pulpit. We took a break of sorts from our Deep in Christ series, and we spent the day looking at an Old Testament character that lived deep. Noah wasn’t a surface level guy. The flood account in Genesis 6-8 tells us that Noah was different from the rest of the world. Noah’s example helps us to understand how exactly we might live deep. Let’s review how we can do just that.

 

Be Deep in Character

Noah found favor with God. He was righteous, blameless, and walked with God before the events of the flood took place. Noah had a deep relationship with God because he was deep in character. Have you found favor with God? Do you live a righteous, blameless, walk with God sort of life? Noah had faith in God. He put complete trust in Him. We need to trust God that He’s got our best intentions in mind. He already has proven that he does. The proof is shaped like a cross.

 

Go Deep in Calling

Character wasn’t the only thing that Noah had, he also found God’s calling. Just believing isn’t good enough. James tells us that faith without action is dead. Instead, Genuine faith always produces action. Because of Noah’s deep character, he was pushed to live a life of deep calling. He built the ark, the animals were assembled, he brought the food, he went aboard with his family. Noah did all that God asked of him. Are you living the life God has called you to live? Are you living a life of prayer? Are you in God’s word? Are you different from the world? Do you share the Gospel?

 

Live a Deep Life of Commitment

When the flood waters were washed away, and the ark finally came to rest on dry land, the first thing that Noah did was build an altar and offer burnt offerings to God. Noah saw all that God had done and he was pushed to worship after the storm had passed. Noah was committed to living a life of worship all the time. We should do the same. When things are going good: worship. When you’re healthy: worship. When you’re surrounded by family and friends: worship. But life’s not all good times. We must be committed to living a life of worship in the good and the bad. Are you sick, dying, alone, hurting, depressed, or angry? Time to worship.

 

Noah lived deep. He had deep character, deep calling, and deep commitment. What kind of life are you living? A surface level sort of life, or are you deep? Go deep this week!

 

(Photo by Flickr User: Matthias Hiltner)

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Thoughts? Comment below!

Rainbows Butterflies

Life Isn’t Always Rainbows and Butterflies

A lot of pastors today teach what’s called the prosperity gospel. Maybe you’ve heard this type of message before? This is where, we hear claims that the promises of God are just waiting at your footsteps. Prosperity preachers indicate that health, wealth, and happiness are what you always get when you walk with God. The problem with this prosperity gospel is that it isn’t the truth at all.

If you’re at all familiar with the Old Testament, you know of the prophets, like Jeremiah. Jeremiah was called by God, but not to a life of prosperity. He committed his whole life to doing God’s work, and in return was rewarded with a life of tears, torment, and torture. Like many of the other prophets of the O.T., Jeremiah is just one example of why the prosperity gospel just isn’t true. Life isn’t always rainbows and butterflies.

 

God never promised earthly reward.

Unfortunately, God never promised that this life would be easy. We’re all just a bunch of sinners living together on the same planet. There’s bound to be trouble eventually. Life itself has it’s fair share of challenges and difficulties we have to overcome. The fact of the matter is that God never promised his followers earthly reward. He didn’t say that this life would be easy, but he said that many would be persecuted. Look how they treated Jesus. That’s how you will be treated as a follower of Christ.

 

In the darkness of life, you’re not alone.

Though we were never promised an earthly reward for following Jesus, we are told that we’re not alone. God became flesh and lived a sinless life. After a few years of ministry, he was falsely accused, beaten, and tortured. He went to the cross on our behalf. Jesus lived through the worst of times for us. He warned his followers that there would be times when we’d be treated in a similar fashion. When we face one of life’s many difficulties, we need to remember that Jesus persevered through difficult times. He went to the cross. He can help you through it. We’re not alone when life gets dark.

 

There are many people that are struggling right now to get through the many challenges that life throws our way. We don’t need more false promises of health, wealth, and happiness. These lies only lead to disappointment. Instead we need to remember that life can get tough, but we’re not alone. If you’re experiencing a difficulty and would like to know more about how Jesus can help you through it, contact Scott today.

 

(Photo by Flickr User: Beverley Goodwin)

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Have a thought or a story? Share it in the comments below!

Noah

God Remembered Noah

Have you ever felt alone? Have you ever felt like you couldn’t do it on your own? I know Noah did. In the early pages of Genesis we read about a man who walked with God. Noah was clearly different from the rest of the world, which was deteriorating rapidly. Men and women were plain wicked. Genesis 6:5 sums it up perfectly when it says, “every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually.” Creation had turned completely evil.

In order to fix this mess, God decided to start over. He killed off the entire planet with a global flood. Maybe you remember the rest of the story: Noah, his family, and animals of every kind were spared. After 40 days and 40 nights of rain, and after the earth was covered in water for 150 days, something interesting happened. God remembered Noah.

 

Your life matters to God.

In Noah’s day, the world had turned so evil that God destroyed everybody except for one. Noah was different. He mattered to God. Have you ever realized that you matter to God too? Don’t worry, God won’t flood the earth again. God won’t kill off the entire population of earth and spare just one. He’s not going to call you to build an ark in your backyard, but you do matter to him. You matter so much that he willingly died on the cross to cover your sins.

Jesus gave up his own life in place of ours. Because of our sins, we had a price that had to be paid. Because of our wrongdoings, we aren’t able to enjoy the fellowship with God like Noah once had. But when God became flesh, all that changed. Jesus showed his love for us on the cross. He lived a perfect life in order to be the perfect sacrifice. He died, so that we could live with him. That’s how much you matter to God.

 

You can make all the difference.

Noah was called by God to construct the ark. He was told to build it using exact specifications in order to save mankind, and the rest of creation. Noah made all the difference. Like I said, God won’t call you to build an ark in your backyard in order to save the world from pending destruction. Though God won’t call you to build a boat, he does call you to life a live of action. In living out God’s purpose for your life, though you’re only one person, you can make all the difference like Noah did. Go live for God!

 

God remembered Noah. He mattered to God and made a difference. Like Noah, you also matter to God. When you live the life God called you to live, you can make all the difference too. If you haven’t started a relationship with Jesus, I encourage you to read through the Gospel message in full. Have questions? Want to begin that journey towards walking with God? Contact Scott today.

 

(Photo by Flickr User: Keoni Cabral)

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Share your thoughts in the comments below!